Tag Archives: medicine

** Admissions by Henry Marsh

Following Do No HarmAdmissions: Life as a Brain Surgeon revisits some of the same materials, but, written from the perspective of recent retirement, explores more sweeping themes, some reprising the familiar rants against poor hospital administration and others new, such as his view on training new surgeons. The author continues to display deep emotion for this work and his patient, which is very heartwarming — and at the same time he is not afraid to share episodes of his wicked temper.

The narrative meanders occasionally, too much to my taste but it’s much better than any gripping hospital drama.

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Filed under Non fiction

*** My Lovely Wife in the Psych Yard by Mark Lukach

My Lovely Wife in the Psych in the Psych Yard is the memoir of a man whose wife had several episodes of severe breakdowns, each involving lengthy hospitalizations, uncertain prognoses, and tremendous burdens on him as he tried to care for her and their son. It’s a weighty subject matter, and the author does not avoid the horrors of mental illness, the weaknesses of the psychiatric medical system, or the hardships on caregivers. He gives us an honest recounting of a very hard time, and we can only admire his pluck, and his wife’s.

 

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Filed under True story

*** Pale Rider by Laura Spinney

 

The Spanish flu epidemic has always been important in my family because one of my great-grandmothers died of it leaving her son, my grandfather, bereft. It killed over 50 million people, much more than WWI, so my great-grandmother was not alone, sadly,

Pale Rider: The Spanish Flu of 1918 and How It Changed the World  presents the epidemic in its historical context, showing how it changed social mores, medicine, business — and geopolitics. The author also sprinkles stories of famous victims of the flu, and there are many to choose from. I loved the fact that she includes not just European and North American countries in her story, but also China, Brazil, and South Africa.

Well worth reading, whether or not you have an ancestor who was a victim of the epidemic.

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Filed under Non fiction

** An American Sickness by Elizabeth Rosenthal

An American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back is a horror show, heavy of the description and analysis of the horror and very light on the solutions. The horror is the US health care system, so incredibly expensive compared to other developed countries and yet yielding such poor results at the population level. The author, a physician turned journalist, cogently describes an industry that is treated as any others but does not obey the normal laws of markets as insurance companies, hospitals, physicians, and the pharmaceutical industry all conspire to increase their profits. I was underwhelmed by the list of “solutions”, which are heavy on patients asking for cost estimates ahead of time and shopping more wisely. Presumably she, with her physician’s background, can both determine which hospitals and physicians to choose and also get an answer to the cost question. Ordinary patients, most probably, cannot.

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Filed under Non fiction

* The Vaccine Race by Meredith Wadman

Let’s start with the admission that I was bored by the slow pace of The Vaccine Race: Science, Politics, and the Human Costs of Defeating Disease, which recounts the way the rubella vaccine was created, and in particular how the human cells that it uses were grown. A more patient reader may more fully appreciate the intrigue: fetus lungs shipped across the Atlantic, babies vaccinated without a hint of proper consent, the illegal transfer of thousands of cells across the country, in a refrigerator strapped to the back seat of a family car, and a lawsuit to boot (about the transfer, not those unimportant consent forms).

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Filed under Non fiction

* Mercies in Disguise by Gina Kolata

Mercies in Disguise: A Story of Hope, a Family’s Genetic Destiny, and the Science That Rescued Them tells the story of a family with an awful genetic disease and its members’ struggle to decide whether to submit to a genetic test that will tell them whether they will die after a slow agony in middle age. It’s not a simple question, and the author does a good job of laying out the layered dilemmas facing the family, but I found the breathless suspense overdone and ultimately a turnoff.

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Filed under Non fiction

** Teeth by Mary Otto

Teeth: The Story of Beauty, Inequality, and the Struggle for Oral Health in America is an expose against the dental care system in America, which leaves a sizable minority of Americans without care, and with awful toothaches and infections. The author exposes how dentist associations have fought to keep the equivalent of nurse practitioners banned while allowing Medicaid coverage for dental work to be pretty much useless since few dentists take Medicaid patients at all, and most only a few.

The book is somewhat repetitive and often overly sensational but does a good job of exposing a sad corner of America.

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Filed under New fiction