Category Archives: Non fiction

*** The Volunteer by Jack Fairweather

The Volunteer: One Man, an Underground Army, and the Secret Mission to Destroy Auschwitz is the stunning biography of a Polish resistance fighter who let himself be imprisoned at Auschwitz to organize the resistance from within. It turns out that there is a task even more difficult than resistance in a concentration camp, and that is convincing the world that what is happening inside the camp is really happening, and could be stopped without too much difficulty. An amazing story that elevates itself from a recitation of facts.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Non fiction

** Underland by Robert Macfarlane

The author of Underland: A Deep Time Journey explores caves, quarries, the Paris catacombs, abandoned mines, storage caverns for nuclear waste, sinkholes, and more, some with legit guides and others not so much. He’s interested in prehistoric art, the health of the ice cap, war crimes, and plant mutualism. The book strongly reminded me of Being a Beast for its maverick feel and ability to describe the feelings of being in very odd places.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Non fiction

*** Deep Medicine by Eric Topol

The author of Deep Medicine: How Artificial Intelligence Can Make Healthcare Human Again, a cardiologist, is endlessly optimistic about how AI can not only help reach diagnoses that elude us today, but also help physicians spend more time, and more meaningful time, with patients. After reading the book, I’m skeptical about the latter claim (not that it’s not true; it’s not very much discussed in the book), but convinced about the former. Whether it’s patient-specific nutrition, mining electronic records, reading ECGs, or interpreting routine imaging, machines are just better at it than humans, and certainly better than tired or distracted humans who may fail to engage their deep troubleshooting skills. Let’s hope that medical schools can produce physicians who will deploy the empathy patients (including the author, when he is a patient) crave for, in addition to the wonderful diagnosing technology that is being developed.

Leave a comment

Filed under Non fiction

* Furious Hours by Casey Cep

Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee stars a pastor who killed several of his wives and family members for the life insurance money from policies he had thoughtfully purchased shortly before their deaths–and Harper Lee, of To Kill a Mockingbird fame, who studied the trial of his murderer, a relative of one of the many victims. The book tries to blend the stories of the murders, a biography of Harper Lee, and the transcripts of the trial (since Harper Lee ultimately decided that she could not write a proper book from it)– and fails. There’s simply no good connection to be made. Too bad. That murderous pastor sounds quite intriguing.

Leave a comment

Filed under Non fiction

* First You Write A Sentence by Joe Moran

First You Write a Sentence: The Elements of Reading, Writing . . . and Life is an opinionated book about writing, more of a reflection of writing than a self-help book, for the most part, and often not welcoming to the casual writer. What should we make of, “A long sentence should feel like it is pushing at its edges while still keeping its shape.”? There are some very helpful tactical tips near the end, as in pressing enter after each sentence to immediately see that there is an appropriate mix of long and short sentences, but the overall book was a slog, for me casual writer.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Non fiction

* Grinnell by John Taliaferro

I just could not warm up to Grinnell: America’s Environmental Pioneer and His Restless Drive to Save the West, a meticulously researched biography of George Grinnell, stockbroker turned environmental activist, founder of the Audubon Society and proponent of the Endangered Species Act. Why? For one, the pace of the book is glacial, recounting, day by day, Grinnell’s travels in the West, along with all kinds of less relevant stories such as the amount of money he sent to his mother in law. Also, having read  The Fair Chase, I already knew parts of the story. But the main obstacle was Grinnell himself, a rich New Yorker who, granted, did not spend his money on parties and cars, but still acted as if Yellowstone, once protected as a national park, should be his own playground and not shared with the hoi polloi. And while the writer defends his pretty racist views of Native Americans (always called “Indians” in the text!) as enlightened for the time, that’s a pretty low standard.

Fun fact: in Grinnell’s days, freshmen at Yale studied algebra and geometry. Not too taxing, right? They did study Latin and Greek, however, presumably not to be lumped in with the aforementioned hoi polloi.

Leave a comment

Filed under Non fiction

** Range by David Epstein

Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World has a simple premise: many inventions come from outsiders to the field, or at least people who have outside interests. The author provides many examples of athletes and Nobel prizes who started somewhere else. It’s a compelling story, but of course it’s only a story, and one would want some more validation, of which the author provides only a few, if tantalizing, studies. Perhaps not surprisingly, it seems that deep learning, which forces the learner to struggle a bit instead of getting helpful hints from the start, results in initially worse performance but over time proves to create more resilient and capable learners. May all teachers and parents hear that!

Leave a comment

Filed under Non fiction