Monthly Archives: March 2010

Books of the Month – March 2010

No overwhelmingly perfect book this month but I liked these four stories:

  • Forest Gate, a tough story of Somalian immigrants in a grim London suburb
  • Labor Day, a sweet long weekend if you can forget the unlikeliness of it all
  • Frozen Sun, a mystery set in Alaska with a tortured love story weaved in
  • Atlas of Unknowns, a story of two Indian sisters, lies, and do-gooders Americans
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Filed under New fiction

Eating Animals by Jonathan Saffran Foer

Eating Animals is about not eating animals because it’s bad for the planet and, unsurprisingly, bad for the animals (who knew?). The book starts in a light-hearted and personal mood with the author’s grandmother stuffing him with food as she remembers the deprivation of WWII, but then settles in a strident, if not always one-sided, expose of factory farming techniques. It’s a little hard to face chicken after reading the descriptions of their often unsanitary killing methods, not to mention their limited lives, but I feel quite fine eating a Thanksgiving turkey that’s been (the author’s word!) unloved.

Clearly there’s much that could be done to guard against the follies of agribusiness (surely those chickens could be slaughtered more cleanly). But it seems to me that a more productive alternative to the moral diktat against meat, since we are natural omnivores, would be to focus on the quantity and quality of the meat we eat. And I would vote to concentrate on making sure human beings are treated fairly before agitating about unloved turkeys.

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Filed under Non fiction

The Quants by Scott Patterson

The Quants features arrogant math and computer science wizs, indecent displays of wealth, and obsessively controlling financial company executives. What’s there to like? Not much, as the book tediously lumbers through the story of how the inmates of the asylum blindly ignored the inconvenient fact that the “reasonable” assumptions built into their clever trading programs could be overrun — and the guards, the regulators, either were too limited to see that or did not dare stop the mad building of play money.

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Filed under Non fiction

Fly By Wire by William Langewiesche

The author of Fly by Wire has a simple view of why US Airways Flight 1549 landed safely in the Hudson River on a cold day of January, 2009: it was the plane. It’s true that most plane crashes are caused by pilot errors, and he regales us with several tales of foolishness to illustrate that fact, and it’s true that the Airbus was designed from the start to counteract bad pilot decisions — but his  adamant refusal, at least until the last chapters,  to recognize the pilot’s and crew’s contribution comes across as shrill and perhaps jealous (the captain seems to have gotten a much better book deal than he did!) He also over-reaches his conclusions: how can he know what really happened with the Air France flight from Brazil to Paris that disappeared over the Atlantic and firmly asserts that it was not a plane problem? Add to that some curiously insensitive one-liners (the French are “less weak than they may seem”, a gratuitous comment after a plane crash that killed three people; a Hispanic woman on the US Airways flight as a “Latin” version of events because her memory differs from others) and you have a book that is not endearing, to say the least.

Read what the pilot wrote instead.

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The Tyranny of E-mail by John Freeman

The Tyranny of E-mail starts with a short history of communication through the ages, from clay tablets to mail to the telegraph, and segues into a long moan about how email is gobbling up our time, destroying social bonds, and turning us into, gasp, non-readers. I’ll let you judge how email could translate to non-reading, as I have yet to master the feat of reading email without, well, reading. (The author means the death of reading actual books, books in which paragraphs are indicated by indented lines rather than skipped lines (I’m not kidding on this point, even as I use  blasphemous embedded parentheses.) But that doesn’t mean people are not reading!)

While I completely agree that Blackberry junkies should be avoided (Blackberries under the pillow at night? please!), it’s really all about the way we allow our lives to be invaded, or not, by technology. I, for one, bless email for allowing easy communication with people in far-flung locations.

In brief, the only thing I really liked in this book is a diagram of Arpanet, circa March, 1977, clearly showing beloved, ancient PDP-10s and 11s scattered around the country in such lovely spots as NSA, Belvoir, Mofett, and the Lawrence Livermore Lab. Wonder what the purpose was for all that technology…

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Unfinished Desires by Gail Godwin

In a  contrived format supposed to highlight the writing of her memoir by the long-retired headmistress of a Catholic boarding school for girls, Unfinished Desires tells the story of mothers and daughters who attended the school, at convenient twenty-year intervals, creating long-lasting hatreds and intense, if short-lived friendships.

The stifling atmosphere of the school, all the more so because of the overbearing personality of the headmistress, is nicely rendered but the rest of the story seems overdone, tedious, and worse of all, not believable. It’s hard to believe that fifteen-year old girls in a 50s’ Catholic boarding school would be quite so well-informed about adults’ romantic goings-on. And those little rivalries and petty bullying episodes are so dull. The most fluent part of the book are the descriptions of modern-days house remodeling, hair stylist, and other episodes of affluent suburbs — not that they are any more interesting than the teenage gossip.

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Flawless by Scott Selby and Greg Campbell

How about a non-fiction book that reads like a mystery? Flawless is the story of a gigantic heist of diamonds and many other goodies from the heart of the diamond district in Antwerp. Although most of the thieves were caught and sentenced, almost none of the looted pieces were ever found — and clearly if you’re going to steal something a diamond is a great choice because it’s essentially impossible to trace.

But what I found most interesting in this book is not the diamonds but the way the elaborate security measures were defeated by a careful study of the habits of the security guards, and in that I was reminded of other books about art thefts, recent or not. It seems that whatever the thickness of the steel door protecting the treasures, it’s very, very useful not to store the key in a closet nearby!

The author, having done background research on Italy (the country of the thieves) and diamonds, unhelpfully includes rather irrelevant bits of his research here and there. I’m pretty sure that the Punic wars are fascinating to some, but they have little bearing on this particular story. And he repeatedly expresses surprise that the Belgian justice system works differently from the US system – why not? But you can skip the boring bits.

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Filed under True story