Tag Archives: religion

*** Priestdaddy by Patricia Lockwood

So this is the good book of the week: Priestdaddy, the unlikely memoir of the daughter of a Catholic priest (yes, it is possible to be a Catholic priest and be married and have children; read the book to discover the loophole). Be warned that it starts a little slowly, with the author and her husband reluctantly but gratefully moving back into the rectory where her parents live, after a ruinous health scare. And because it’s the rectory, there’s also an awkward seminarian living there, whom she likes to terrorize (it does not take much!) The story picks up speed — and old memories — and pretty soon we find ourselves swimming in stilted dinners with the bishop (helped along with some Mountain Vodka Dew), picketing abortion clinics as a young child, and perusing liturgical-supplies catalogs. It’s David Sedaris meets Mennonite in a Little Black Dress, sweet and hilarious and complicated like large families can be.

 

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* The Evolution of the West by Nick Spencer

It seems pretty obvious that Christianity has left a deep mark in Western societies, so it’s not exactly clear why we would need a book to discuss this, but the author argues, rather strenuously, against atheists’ claims to the contrary . In any case, I did not really understand The Evolution of the West: How Christianity Has Shaped our Values. It is certainly written by someone with impressive knowledge of history but I could not grasp its arc.

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*** The Wonder by Emma Donoghue

Emma Donoghue wrote the stunning Room (and other novels I did not like so much) and with The Wonder, she returns with a claustrophobic story of a “starving girl” in 19th century Ireland, whose food-free existence brings her family fame. A nurse is brought in to investigate this miracle and she will eventually untangle the mystery and save the girl in violent fashion.

The author captures the circumscribed existence in the small Irish village, the all-powerful role of the church, and never tries to simplify characters to fit the story. Bravo!

 

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* The Refugees by Arthur Conan Doyle

Much better know for his Sherlock Holmes series, Arthur Conan Doyle also wrote historical novels, of which he was apparently very proud.  The Refugees is one of them, and it ambitiously traces the picaresque adventures of a young American who travels to France, helps his Protestant friend survive many perils in procuring a priest for the secret marriage of Louis XV and Madame de Maintenon, and swiftly retreats to North America with friend, friend’s wife, and friend’s father upon the banishing of Huguenots from France. The French adventures are far-fetched — but what happens on the way back (iceberg, Indian attacks) seems utterly unbelievable. Add to that the totally helpless wife who cannot even see the fauna and flora of Canada without them being pointed out to her by her menfolk, and it becomes clear why Sherlock Holmes remains Conan Doyle’s legacy.

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** Not in God’s Name by Rabbi Jonathan Sacks

I was disappointed by Not in God’s Name: Confronting Religious Violence because I felt misled by its subtitle: it is not a book about the entangled roots of violence and religion, although the author does discuss them, quickly, in the beginning of the book. It also focuses mostly on violence done to Jews, which is a vast and interesting topic, but it would have been interesting to cover in more detail violence done to and by other religious groups. And finally the bulk of the book is an erudite discussion and analysis of Genesis that points out all kinds of details about the violence that is so prevalent in that famous book — fascinating for some I’m sure but not quite my cup of tea, and in any case I do not think that the average religious person who wants to commit violence first stops to carefully consider what the book says…

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** Islam and The Future of Tolerance by Sam Harris and Maajid Nawaz


Islam and the Future of Tolerance: A Dialogue features an atheist and a Muslim talking about Islam — although I often felt that the former should shut up and listen to the latter, who seems both better informed and more measured. The best part of the book for me was the careful distinctions between jihadists, Islamists, and conservative and reformer Muslims.

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*** Accidental Saints by Nadia Bolz-Weber


Accidental Saints: Finding God in All the Wrong People is a loose memoir and reflections by an unconventional Lutheran pastor: a tattooed ex-addict who embraces all comers and believes in grace and love amongst struggles — and adds “Blessed are the closeted” to the standard list of beatitudes. Whether she is on a plane engaging a sullen teenager in conversation or leading the funeral of a suicidal young man, she is the same honest, open person. If you sometimes wonder whether religious people want to exclude rather than welcome, read this book.

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