Tag Archives: racism

** In The Country of Women by Susan Straight

Susan Straight’s family, considered jointly with her ex-husband’s, contains an astonishing number of remarkable women who fled poverty, violence, slavery, and quite a number of bad men. In The Country of Women recounts their stories, moving from the present to the distant past in chapters that hopscotch across time and the country, and Switzerland as well.  There is also a warm description of how her neighborhood sustains her and her daughters, and in turn expects her to help all manners of relatives and friends of the family. Family pictures enliven the lot

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** The Gone Dead by Chanelle Benz

In The Gone Dead, Billie James’s black father died in suspicious circumstances, years go, in Mississippi, and his daughter, who grew up with her white mother in Philadelphia goes back “home” to investigate. She will face a hostile set of neighbors and family members who just don’t want to revisit the past, let alone share it with her. Some characters, and notably an ambitious academic who is writing a biography of her dad, a poet, are aptly drawn, but the story itself is elongated to the point of ennui. Too bad because the plot is compelling and complex.

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** Biased by Jennifer Eberhardt

The best parts of Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do, for me, are when the author describes experiments that show how deeply rooted prejudice can be, for instance that we don’t process “out-group” faces as deeply as more familiar faces, or that we do not notice nonverbal slights against minority characters in TV shows (and the actors in the shows may not notice either!). Other chapters present a more standard recitation of past and present racism horrors of various types. Sadly, there’s not a whole lot that can be done to change implicit bias, although training can, blessedly, avoid applying the biases blindly.

 

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** Cherokee America by Margaret Verble

Cherokee America is a fictional matriarch, inspired by the author’s grandmother, and in the story she has to contend with a dying husband, a wayward son, a dead newborn, orphans, a murder, a falsely accused black servant, and the white judge who would love to disrupt Native American justice. It’s an enjoyable rambling story with abundant historical references to the Trail of Tears and the Civil War. A big too much happens to that one woman in the course of the novel, and her son’s sexual urges are described a bit too comprehensively, but it makes for a long and rich story with lots of interesting characters.

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** Girl in Black and White by Jessie Morgan-Owens

Mary Mildred Williams, whose photo graces the cover Girl in Black and White: The Story of Mary Mildred Williams and the Abolition Movement was a slave because her mother was a slave, but she looked so white that she was used by Senator Sumner in abolitionist lectures, with the very uncomfortable argument that a system that enslaves white people must be wrong. O, Senator Sumner! The book traces the history of Mary’s family, starting with her grandmother and the complicated family of her master, and the various legal judgments that accompanied Mary’s move to Boston.

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*** The World According to Fannie Davis by Bridgett Davis

The World According to Fannie Davis: My Mother’s Life in the Detroit Numbers is the story of a fascinating woman, the author’s mother, who ran a successful (illegal) lottery in Detroit for decades. In a less racist environment, she would have managed a much larger business. She is shown balancing her work and her family, including a disabled husband and five children, and helping quite a number of young women through tough times.

A second, strong theme is the sad transformation of Detroit into a violent and very poor city, adding to her private problems in addition to her business problem, competition from the state lottery. The story meanders and repeats itself at times, but it’s well worth reading.

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*** Solitary by Alfred Woodfox

The author of Solitary spent over 40 years in the Angola prison of Louisiana, most of it alone in a cell 23 hours a day, and almost all of it for a crime he did not commit. He freely admits that his life pre-prison was mostly spent on the wrong side of the law, but nothing that would send him away for that long, or under such a harsh treatment. Racism was at the center of the prison (just as a very mild example, the guards were called “freemen”) and institutional racism meant that framing an African-American man for murder was swiftly arranged.  It’s a miracle that he got out, and as undamaged as he did.

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