Monthly Archives: June 2012

** What Money Can’t Buy by Michael Sandel

What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets is full of thoughtful dilemmas of whether the market is always the right answer: should we pay people to stand in line for us? Pay children who get good grades? Purchase carbon offsets when we take that atmosphere-sullying plane ride? Sell Nobel prizes or citizenship rights to the highest bidder? The book is well-written and the examples interesting, but somehow it seems rather obvious (to me) that not everything can be bought — and even more that not everything should be for sale — so that made for a not so interesting read.

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Filed under Non fiction

** Beyond Boundaries by Miguel Nicolelis

Beyond Boundaries: The New Neuroscience of Connecting Brains with Machines—and How It Will Change Our Lives makes, perhaps not surprisingly, for tough reading as the author seems bound and determined to share all his research with us — resulting in lots of technical discussions that I did not peruse as thoroughly as I could have. Too bad, since the gist of the research is literally fantastic, allowing animals (for now) to control robots purely through mind control and opening remarkable opportunities for the disabled. The author also displays great affection for the animals in the lab, a protean intellectual curiosity, and a good sense of humor, but not quite enough to carry the technical load, at least for me.

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** The Beginner’s Goodbye by Anne Tyler

In The Beginner’s Goodbye, a lonely man loses his wife to a wholly unexpected accident and finds himself adrift.He works for the family firm, a vanity publisher, where his strong sister also works and tries to help him, but he is very good at keeping her at arms’ length, even when he is forced to move in with her. O, and his dead wife reappears from time to time, which seems to help him regain his composure, if anything. A tender and funny view of loss, regrets, and carrying on.

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Filed under New fiction

* Memoir of a Debulked Woman by Susan Gubar

One would want to look kindly at a book whose author has endured a serious and pretty much untreatable disease and the author of Memoir of a Debulked Woman: Enduring Ovarian Cancer has written an unflinching account of her body’s miseries, together with keen observations of how the medical system as a whole does not serve patients well. But if you have ever wished that a sick friend would hurry up the minute descriptions of her troubles, you may find your patience quickly exhausted. And each experience triggers multiple reminiscences from the large assortment of literature that the scholar-author has read, which makes for many learned dissertations that are not as enjoyable if one is not familiar with the pieces being cited.

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Filed under True story

* Carry the One by Carol Anshaw

Carry the One takes us, ploddingly, from a drunken and drugged crash that kills a young girl to post-crash lives of the car occupants, brother and sisters and friends, none of which seems to accomplish much or reflect much, including on the consequences of the crash — except for the brother who seems not to understand that the parents of the dead girl may not want to see him again, ever. They take their ennui around the world in photogenic places, hop to the nearest disaster  (Katrina) for no discernible charitable reason, are dissatisfied with their mates, and one becomes a full-blown alcoholic. Despite all the action,  I could not get into the story or identify with any of the characters.

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*** Making Babies by Anne Enright

There hasn’t been a baby in my house for many years, but reading Making Babies: Stumbling into Motherhood brought back many memories. The author organizes the book into a series of essays, the first one weirdly focused on aliens (as brought to mind by pregnancy, she says logically but it’s a little weird!) and the last one a most enjoyable jumble of snippets she tells about writing whenever she had a few minutes saved from childcare duties. Whether it’s the awkward ob-gyn visits, the vicarious pleasure of the baby’s first step on grass, the inadmissible desire to just leave the house and the baby and everything else behind, the very funny progression in stroller-buying from the first, rushed and unskilled purchase, to the purely utilitarian one, she writes of things we regular mothers have forgotten, or would not know how to write about, or would not write about so eloquently. Very nicely done.

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** Faith No More by Phil Zuckerman

The author of Faith No More: Why People Reject Religion is a sociologist who is presenting the outcome of dozens of interviews with people who once believed but no longer do, and it’s an interesting tapestry of individual experiences, but I felt that the stories could use some deeper analysis to tie them together and make sense of them in a more global manner. In particular, the United States, which is the focus of the study, is still very religious compared to other developed countries. Is the rise in the number of non believers a sign of convergence or a blip? Is the loss of community reported by non believers a natural result of their leaving the faith of their families of origins or is it something more essential,  as so well described in Religion for Atheists? The author doesn’t make much of an attempt to go beyond the interviews, unfortunately.

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Filed under Non fiction