Monthly Archives: July 2016

** In The Darkroom by Susan Faludi

In The Darkroom recounts the author’s long quest to figure out who her father really is, a father who abandoned his family and who, after a long estrangement, informs her that he is now a woman. (She continues to refer to her as “my father” but uses feminine pronouns throughout, which makes for confusing sentences!) It turns out that her father, who moved back to his (her) native Hungary later in life, had a charmed upbringing in Budapest followed by a harrowing escape from the Nazis. It all comes out, very, very slowly, along with the sex-change operation in Thailand and the questionable bureaucratic games s/he played to get there.

 

I much preferred the parts of the story that were personal and centered on the father rather than the more general historical references. Such a complicated personality!

Leave a comment

Filed under True story

** The End of American Childhood by Paula Fass

 

The End of American Childhood: A History of Parenting from Life on the Frontier to the Managed Child is a scholarly review of chid-rearing practices in the United States that shows the evolution of the concept of children from hardworking additions to the household to today’s pampered and helicoptered  weaklings. It’s hard to believe that the Society for he Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was founded in the late 19th century before anyone thought of doing something equivalent for children!

The author uses many stories from the childhoods of well-known historical figures to illustrate her points and it’s also interesting to see how the economic context shaped the changes in the lives  of children rather than any grand theory of child-rearing. That said, she has a long rant against modern books about child-rearing that accuses them (correctly) of not considering the historical perspective, a rant that seems irrelevant and needlessly petulant.

Leave a comment

Filed under Non fiction

*** The Cook Up by D Watkins

It’s a good thing that I knew as I read The Cook Up: A Crack Rock Memoir that the author lived to write his memoir, because bullets fly, overdoses happen, and many young men, dealers and addicts both, die over the course of the story, many ending their days bleeding in the arms of the author. The level of violence in East Baltimore is famous, by now, but this story vividly illustrates why young men don’t think they will make it to 20, which may explain some of the risks they take. The author never tries to prescribe solutions for the children who grow up in an environment where drug dealers are the ones with money and power, even if they don’t last long — but the problems are terrifying.

Leave a comment

Filed under True story

** The Highest Glass Ceiling by Ellen Fitzpatrick

Congrats to Hillary! Am I the only one to think it’s a little weird to call the female presidential candidate by her first name and the male candidate by his last name? A little disrespectful, perhaps? In any case, Ms. Clinton is not the first woman to run for president, and more interestingly she is not the first one to be on the ballot: she is the first one to be nominated by a major party. The Highest Glass Ceiling: Women’s Quest for the American Presidency tells the story of three women who ran before her, one who created her own party in the process (at a time when most women could not vote at all!) and two who campaigned all the way to their parties’ conventions. It’s so interesting to see a candidate in 1871 arguing that equality is not just a concept, but must be made concrete, or that the smear campaign against her focused on her supposed sexual escapades. Or that the second one, Margaret Chase Smith, was the only female senator upon her election in 1949. The most sobering lesson from this book is the historically gigantic financial gap between male and female candidates. It’s hard to be heard on a shoestring.

Leave a comment

Filed under Non fiction

** The Happiness Track by Emma Sepal

Happiness is a trendy topic and I must have read too many books on the topic (here, here, here!) so The Happiness Track: How to Apply the Science of Happiness to Accelerate Your Success, nicely written and nicely researched, did not seem to contain much that was new or different from what I had already read. If this is your first happiness book you will enjoy it more.

Leave a comment

Filed under Non fiction

** Imagine Me Gone by Adam Hasslett

Imagine Me Gone is the story of a family with a father and son with severe depression and for me the best part of the story was how the other family members manage to hide the problems from each other and to the outside world, and continue to believe that all will be well. That said, no touch happens in the story and more patient readers than I may enjoy it more than I did.

Leave a comment

Filed under New fiction

** Weatherland by Alexandra Harris

Weatherland: Writers & Artists Under English Skies is an erudite review of how weather figures in the work of British artists. (English artists? That’s what the title says but she makes reference to Wales; how can a non-Brit figure it out?)

So we start, with Roman-time orders for some nice woolens. Poor Romans, they must have felt cold, and damp, in Britain… We plow through Chaucer, and Ms. Harris insist we read it in the original language. Maybe a footnote would suffice? We peek at toes being warmed on a fire in medieval illustrations. I liked the art better than the literature, both because the illustrations are perfect and because much is lacking in my knowledge of British literature. A treat for literary Anglophiles, and an interesting read for everyone else.

Leave a comment

Filed under Non fiction