Tag Archives: technology

*** The Code by Margaret O’Mara

The author of The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America does not think much of the suburbs South of San Francisco: they are smoggy (mostly not, actually), featureless (she has a point here), and dotted with boring tilt-up buildings (that’s changing, fast). But she is not too interested in the land, more the remarkable transformation of it into the worldwide hub of technology. She tells a well-researched story of how mavericks came to populate the valley previously known for its orchards and eventually created a remarkable climate where startups could flourish, although mostly fail, and change the world. I particularly enjoyed the way she described the relationships between Silicon Valley and politics, from hands-off beginnings to strong lobbying efforts.

I was very surprised that no mention is made at all or Oracle or Salesforce (or any B2B software firms). Interesting choice.

Leave a comment

Filed under Non fiction

* How to Do Nothing by Jenny Odell

I did not enjoy this “Best Book of the Year”. How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy basically recycles old wisdom, sometimes with a schoolmarmish tone, to assure us that we do not need to be tied to social media, that busy-ness should be fought, and that social media has insidious consequences. Amen, and not sure why we need a book for this. The unexpectedly charming part of the book is the author’s description of specific creeks, parks, even trees in the San Francisco area, where she lives, that should push us to go find them, sans phone of course.

Leave a comment

Filed under Non fiction

*** Coders by Clive Thompson

I live and work amongst programmers, so I was a little apprehensive about reading Coders: The Making of a New Tribe and the Remaking of the World. Would the author get it right? Would I learn anything new? Yes, and yes! The author captures the minutiae of coding, the pleasure of well-designed code, the obsession with scaling. He acknowledges the frat house atmosphere of the male-dominated field, while reminding us that coding was once women’s work. My wish would have been that he spent more time talking about rank-and-file programmers rather than the stars, but the book is informative and even lively. Here’s to all the computer science departments in the land making a real effort to recruiting women and minorities.

Leave a comment

Filed under Non fiction

*** No One At The Wheel by Samuel Schwartz

Living close to the Google headquarters, we see autonomous cars on the road every day (multiple times a day!) and marvel at how they are getting so much better over time, from negotiating four-way stops to seamlessly keeping up  with traffic. No One at the Wheel: Driverless Cars and the Road of the Future is not written by a technologist, but by a transportation expert who was once in charge of New York City traffic. He does not have much to say about the underlying technology but has thought a lot about the transformations that autonomous cars will bring to cities and society in general, including how pedestrians will interact with vehicles that are programmed to stop when challenged (will pedestrians pretty much own the streets?), whether autonomous vehicles will be shared (and if not, if owners will keep them circling rather than park them), and whether they will used as mobile bombs (scary!). He blessedly spends little time bellyaching about the ethical dilemmas of programming cars to avoid pedestrians or trees; it’s pretty clear that, although such situations will exist, they are not the central issues for the future of autonomous driving.

An annoying and rather surprising feature of the author’s argument is his unwavering love of public transit. It’s clear that public transit is required to solve transportation challenges in cities, and that autonomous vehicles (other than autonomous buses) cannot, but he seems unable to accept the well-deserved criticisms that users have about it: it’s dirty, it’s unpredictable, and it’s not flexible. Surely, trying to address these issues would be better than pretending they do not exist.

Leave a comment

Filed under Non fiction

** Bitwise by David Auerbach

Bitwise: A Life in Code is the memoir of a programmer, and I thought that its most interesting feature was to provide a glimpse of the typical personality of programmers. The author makes it clear from the first sentence, “Computers always offered me a world that made sense. As a child, I sought refuge in computers as a safe, contemplative realm far from the world. People confused me.”

That said the reader also gets to experience the wonders of a segmentation fault on page 37. It’s kinda unpleasant for non-programmers… But other chapters are more successful, as when he compares his infant daughter to a computer that gets upgraded on a regular basis (it’s much less creepy than it sounds, pretty funny actually).

The last part of the book is a reflection on how computers and algorithms are changing the world, and is less successful, in my mind, with the important exception of his thoughts on how data structures drive the way we engage with the world, taking as his example the way Facebook allows its users to characterize themselves. An interesting personal peek into the world of the people who create the technology we use.

Leave a comment

Filed under True story

** Technically Wrong by Sara Wachter-Boettcher

Technically Wrong: Sexist Apps, Biased Algorithms, and Other Threats of Toxic Tech raises all kinds of issues with our reliance on processes embedded in technology: silently racist or sexist online forms, emotion-deaf social network notifications, prejudices baked into algorithms, and of course the lack of diversity of the industry that creates all these tools.

It’s good to talk about problems. What’s not so good about this book is that the author seems to have just one mode: total outrage. And while some of the things she reports on are indeed outrageous (why should women or people of color be excluded from Silicon Valley’s hiring networks?), others are just mechanized versions of offline errors, or poor execution by a relatively new industry. Those sexist online forms? They are just the latest embodiment of sexist hard-copy forms. Not a reason to keep them as they are, for sure, but hardly cause for outrage. The social network that reminds you of your mother’s death a year ago? Terrible choice, but someone (armies of someones!) is hard at work to make sure that you will look at the app today, and they know that death reminders don’t work too well for that.

A more nuanced approach would better highlight the central, ugly truth: self-learning machines will readily recognize and amplify biases in the data they survey. So if all the computer programmers are while males, they will form a very strong concept of programmers as white males. Pretty much the thinking from which we work hard to de-program ourselves…

Leave a comment

Filed under New fiction

Life in Code: A Personal History of Technology is presented as a memoir but is organized as a series of essays, roughly chronological to be sure but more essays than biography. The author is a woman who started in the technology field in the early 80s, so a pioneer. My favorite parts of the book are the ones where she talks about how her work, whether it’s the byzantine hierarchy between assembly coders and application coders, the frenzy around Y2k, or the quest to find and fix a bug that eluded other programmers for years (really! and she makes it as fun as a treasure hunt, which it is).

The essays when she reflects about the consequences of technological advances are less successful, in my mind. Sure, gentrification happened in her neighborhood (she has a wonderful story of a little city park morphing from skid row to white tablecloths, and back, during the 2000 bubble, which illustrates the hubris of the time perfectly) but that does not mean that technology is bad — or good, for that matter.

Still, I would recommend this book to anyone working in the tech world today, for a historical perspective and also a strong description of what it’s like as a woman to work in a man-dominated world.

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under True story