Tag Archives: technology

** Irresistible by Adam Alter

The author of Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked takes sometimes meandering path through the psychology of behavioral addiction, and especially how manufacturers of electronic devices and apps exploit our built-in vulnerability to keep us checking our phone and our Facebook account at all hours. It’s just a little sad that all these smart programmers are basically toiling to bind us more tightly to our screens.

Perhaps it will inspire us to give it a rest and take our revenge on the whole conspiracy.

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Filed under Non fiction

* Whiplash by Joi Ito and Jeff Howe

Whiplash: How to Survive Our Faster Future sets out, it claims, to help us cope with fast technological change, but it often reads more as a book-length paean to the MIT Media Lab, where the two authors work, and even more awkward, to Joi Ito, the first author. Too bad, since beyond the hubris are some interesting concepts, especially showing how static, top-down institutions fare badly in a fast-moving present, let alone future. The book is also filled with fun facts of all kinds, including celebrating the 1860s machinist that proposed a standard thread profile for screws (thank you, William Sellers).

Sadly, the book seems to be written from a bubble of wealth, education, and ultimate comfort and control of technology, with crippling blind spots.  For instance, the authors marvel that a Canadian handyman who dropped out of a physics PhD program to take care of his parents is a great inventor, proving that anyone can do R&D (really!) and their adventures in the wilds of Detroit, MI, to help citizens brave the streets at night are especially awkward. We want people who invent, fearlessly, but perhaps they should not try to philosophize too much.

 

The bubble in who

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Filed under Non fiction

** A Truck Full Of Money by Tracy Kidder

A Truck Full of Money: One Man’s Quest to Recover from Great Success tells the story of Paul English, the founder of Kayak, who was born in a working class Boston family and went on to create several successful computer companies (and some not so much!), make millions, and generously distribute riches around him. Perhaps to evoke the highs and lows of the bipolar  disorder he suffered from, undiagnosed, for decades, the book is messy and non-linear, and it’s not always clear where the author is taking us — but the story is certainly inspiring, especially the generous nature of the main character who seems more interested in building great things than rolling in the dough.

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Filed under True story

*** The Book by Keith Houston

Like books? From the moment you grab this one, The Book: A Cover-to-Cover Exploration of the Most Powerful Object of Our Time, you will know it’s a winner, since its very cover embodies the topic: how books are printed, illustrated, and made. It’s a history of books that starts in ancient Egypt and China and even if you are curious about books and know quite a bit of the history I guarantee you will find new and delightful factoids, from the proper way to cut a papyrus stem to create a usable sheet to how Holy Roman Emperor Frederik II banned paper because he saw it as a horrible Muslim invention. We are introduced to typesetting technology and lithography, and how books are stitched and formed (have you noticed that hard-cover books are concave in the front? I had not!) And nary a whine about the upcoming death of books in favor f electronic media. A delight.

 

 

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Filed under New fiction

*** Grunt by Mary Roach

Can one write a book about war that doesn’t talk about weapons? Yes, and Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War proves it. Instead, the author talks about the labs in Natick, MA, that test fabric for uniforms (and gently makes fun of the specialists’ outstanding New England accent), how a wedding dress designer can get interested in mittens with one finger for snipers. Other topics are more challenging, showing how a different lab uses cadavers to test armored vehicles, how surgeons reconstruct penises lost to real bombs, and how doctors use maggots to clean wounds. A strong stomach is recommended! Still, there are plenty of humorous moments as when we learn that powered bug juice is a good tool to minimize toilet odors in submarines. Who knew?

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Filed under Non fiction

** Door to Door by Edward Humes

Door to Door: The Magnificent, Maddening, Mysterious World of Transportation‘s ambitious subtitle overreaches but the author delivers a wealth of information in a highly readable narrative: if you suspect transportation is a boring topic, you will be very pleasantly surprised. Most of the stories focus on Southern California ports, where the author is based, and we get to visit with the UPS district manager, the ship dispatchers who orchestrate the arrivals of container ships (these women have a lot of power!), and the anonymous crate operators (who unload 28 containers per hour, which boggled my mind). If you have ever wondered how your food, clothes, cars, gas, and electronic devices got to you, read this!

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Filed under New fiction

** Emotional Design by Don Norman

Following the wonderful The Design of Everyday Things, Norman brings us Emotional Design: Why We Love (or Hate) Everyday Things, which shows how objects can appeal to us on a visceral level, a behavioral level, or a reflective (emotional) level, and  how we can be drawn to objects that make us feel good even though they may be useless.

There is a long, rather tedious, and seemingly unconnected chapter about robots, which you may want to skip. The rest of the examples are lively and inspiring.

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Filed under Non fiction