Tag Archives: politics

** The Evangelicals by Frances Fitzgerald

I’m not sure many readers of The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America have managed to read all 650 pages of it carefully. I certainly did not, and I found the detailed stories of the various political machinations and scandals very tedious.

That said, I found it most interesting to see the how some of the themes of the early start of the movement, during the Great Awakening, sound quite modern. The author also does a great job of showing how the thirst for political influence shapes the values that are put forth — abortion restrictions rather than anti-poverty campaigns, for instance. We are quite far from religious values and

 

 

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Filed under Non fiction

*** White Working Class by Joan C. Williams

The author of White Working Class: Overcoming Class Cluelessness in America has a mission: to educate the “elite” her word, which she defines as semi-rich people (the top 20%) with a college degree, about the working class, which she defines as non-poor (above the bottom 30%) without a college degree.   (I’m still a little confused about how she classifies rich people without a degree, or middle-class folks with one.)

 

The book reminded me of Strangers in Their Own Land, but, unlike it and for the better, it starts from the perspective of working class people rather than trying to force ideas upon them and marvel at how they can vote, it seems, against their economic interests. Perhaps if the elite spent more time interacting with the working class it would understand better why working class women don’t care much about the glass ceiling or why it looks going to college as a gamble.

The author gives precious few suggestions on how to bridge the divide, beyond telling the elite to stop despising the working class (and a few well-chosen examples of how the Democratic Party could position issues better). So that was a little disappointing, but overall I recommend this short, well-organized book.

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* The Man Who Knew by Sebastian Mallaby

I suspect that most people who boast of  having read The Man Who Knew: The Life and Times of Alan Greenspan have not, in fact, persevered through 800 pages. (I did, but quickly…)  It’s too bad, since we should probably all know a little more about the Federal Reserve Bank and how financial policy is set but a book this long and this detailed will comfort us in the thought that all this stuff is just too complicated and too tedious.

My favorite part of the book, as is often the case, was Greenspan personal history, a math prodigy raised by a single mother who was utterly devoted to him, and who saw himself at a pure libertarian and statistician — quite at odds with his later political career as a regulator!

The book focuses on his not seeing the 2008 bubble coming, which is a little too easy to say in hindsight — but certainly it was no secret that the real-estate market was bubbling. And to fill the 800 pages we get abundant details about Ayn Rand’s lovers, White House parties, how Greenspan proposed to his second wife, and of course who said what to whom at various Oval Office meetings. Where are the Cliff Notes?

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Filed under True story

** The Soul of the First Amendment by Floyd Abrams

Written by a passionate lawyer, The Soul of the First Amendment fiercely defends the freedom-of-speech right enshrined in the First Amendment, contrasting it with other approaches in several other Western countries. It’s more a pamphlet than a balanced exegesis of the law, and it’s a little scary, since its main point is that putting any restrictions on the First Amendment would amount to intolerable government censorship. Funny that other countries are somewhat managing to place some restrictions on free speech without breaking democracy. Forcefully argued, but lacking a counter-argument.

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Filed under Non fiction

** The Gatekeepers by Chris Whipple

It’s interesting that the author of The Gatekeepers: How the White House Chiefs of Staff Define Every Presidency chose to highlight only the gatekeeping functions of those who may actually be the most powerful people in the US, the presidential chiefs of staff. Readers who love politics will undoubtedly love this book, full of intrigues and details and funny stories. Those who do not, like me, may be nonplussed after reading it. O, the stories and lively and suck you in. But it reveals a White House that is immensely sexist (exhibit A: not a single chief of staff has been a woman), preoccupied by small issues and rivalries rather than important policy decisions, and, as a consequence, apparently incapable of focusing on a few strategic concerns. It’s a miracle that it works at all!

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** Human Acts by Han Kang

Human Acts tells the story of a teenager killed in riots that erupted in South Korea in 1980 through multiple points of view, always staying in an impressionistic mode that keeps us readers on our toes. It would be impossible to tell upbeat stories about what is essentially civil war but this book is particularly dark. I much preferred The Vegetarian by the same author but I admired this achievement.

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Filed under New fiction

** Strangers In Their Own Lands by Arlie Russell Hochschild

Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right starts with a wonderful mission: to listen to conservative voters in the Louisiana bayou and understand how their lives and circumstances brought them to support the Tea Party and Donald Trump. It’s a noble cause, embraced somewhat naively as the author starts with a conviction that people who have suffered many disastrous pollution events should naturally lean left — but of course there are more reasons to choose sides than the environment, and in any case regulations and government interventions post-disasters have left locals bitter about slow and ineffective solutions.

That said, it is very interesting to see how deep-seated emotions such as the disgust at people taking advantage of government benefits (sometimes, interestingly, themselves!) and the deep-seated beliefs that oppressed people should rise up and resist rather than leave their countries can be stirred and exploited by political parties and candidates into cries for lower taxes and fewer refugees.

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Filed under Non fiction