Tag Archives: Africa

*** The Gloaming by Melanie Finn

The Gloaming brings together an unlikely set of three Westerners fleeing various dreadful events of their past into a small town in Tanzania. The story slowly unfolds the characters’ back stories, even as various actors of their pasts track them down. It’s all very dark and cleverly layered, and full of complicated people that are never 100% good or 100% evil. Haunting.

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** Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi

 

Homegoing is an ambitious novel, blending stories from eight different generations of a family from modern-day Ghana, one branch sold into slavery and ending up in the United States, the other one staying behind. The story is heavily, ponderously articulated around historical themes, and I often wished that it would show more than tell: we readers can easily tell that slavery is a horrible system by reading of the characters’ misadventures; we don’t need an harangue to explain. And why the emphasis on royal roots? The story would have been just as good with non-royals, I think.

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*** The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu by Joshua Hammer

The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu: And Their Race to Save the World’s Most Precious Manuscripts tells two stories: first, how the hero of the book managed to gather together hundreds of thousands of ancient manuscripts that had been hidden around Mali after the Timbuktu empire crumbled, and how, just went years later, he (and many others) fought to secrete them out of Timbuktu ahead of Islamist extremists eager to destroy anything that did not correspond to their very peculiar interpretation of the Quran. The book manages to describe the flourishing of Timbuktu in the 1500s, the patient search to obtain the manuscripts from people who were quite doubtful that they would be safe outside their hands (and were right about that!), the quest for funding to restore the manuscripts, and the hair-raising evacuation of the library. While the critics seem to hail the evacuation, I found the earlier sections just as fascinating.

 

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*** The Woman Who Walked in Sunshine by Alexander McCall Smith

The Woman Who Walked in Sunshine is the new installment in the No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series, and, surprise, Mma Ramotswe takes a vacation, the first one ever! Not that she remains entirely idle, since she promptly saves an orphan from abuse and then proceeds to shadow her stand-in through a delicate political investigation (and cleans her kitchen cabinets, thereby warming the hearts of all her female readers, I imagine). She also muses on the delicate balance between direct confrontation and face saving,  and much else. A sweet read to the end.

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** The Lights of Pointe-Noire by Alain Mabanckou

The Lights of Pointe-Noire is a memoir of a Congolese writer, elegantly written as flashbacks from a visit back home, decades after he left. As visitors come and go (and request monetary gifts from the man who went away, hence must be rich), he remembers his school, his mother, his polygamous father, and colonial history. I wonder how he felt going “home” after his visit to a world so different from the Los Angeles where ne now lives.

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*** Kid Moses by Mark Thornton


In an even tone, Kid Moses tells the story of Moses, a young child who lives in Tanzania, orphaned and homeless. He gets beaten up, gets a job, spends some time in a cushy orphanage, escapes with his best friend, and generally makes his own way through life.

It’s sad. And we know, hope, pray, that he will make it. Quite a feat of writing from a child’s point of view.

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* Confession of the Lioness by Mia Couto


Confession of the Lioness is a poetic, dreamlike story of a village in Mozambique plagued by lions — or is it brutal men? The government dispatches a bashful hunter and a journalist to dispatch the lions and a wonderfully drawn official and his wife to take care of the problem.

If you like slow and magical, you may have the patience required for this story.

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