Tag Archives: food

** The Way We Eat Now by Bee Wilson

The author of The Way We Eat Now: How the Food Revolution Has Transformed Our Lives, Our Bodies, and Our World explore how a world that, for the most part, finally has enough food, is at the same time producing badly-fed, if overly large, bodies. She shows how sweet drinks, large plates, solo eating, restaurant eating, horribly unhealthy packaged foods, and government subsidies for sugar and corn all conspired to make more calories and less nutrients available to all of us.

Her suggestions are mostly for individuals, as in eating on smaller plates, and drinking water, although she does suggest teaching children about healthy and tasty foods in school, which seems like a great idea. There should be a way out of moneyed bad eating, right?

 

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* Save Me The Plums by Ruth Reichl

Save Me the Plums: My Gourmet Memoir recounts Ruth Reichl’s tenure as the editor of Gourmet, which was shuttered in 2009, following the latest recession. Unlike her earlier memoirs, one about her mother and the other about her adventures as a food critic, this one disappointed me. At times, it seemed to be no more than a vacuous recitation of the luxuries afforded by the publisher (first-class travel, a generous clothing allowance, and an apparently bottomless expense account), rubbing shoulders with celebrities, and inane office politics. Still, there are several sweet personal stories about her son and interesting ruminations about the strange world of high-end dining.

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** Gumbo Life by Ken Wells

Gumbo Life: Tales from the Roux Bayou tells the story of how gumbo was invented (and there are lots of candidate origins for it) and, along the way, the story of the author’s family who has lived for several generations in a Louisiana bayou. And of course, there are many delectable recipes.

My favorite part of the book were the family stories, many showing the woeful poverty of the recent past and the environmental losses brought about by poor management of the bayous. This is much more than a cookbook.

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** Milk by Mark Kurlansky

Milk!: A 10,000-Year Food Fracas is full of interesting tidbits that would make a great trivia quiz: why Icelandic yogurt is so delicious (and is not yogurt at all!); that 14th Century Arabs made a milk and colostrum (!) mixture; that 18th century French physicians recommended ice cream as health food (I’m in!); that cows produce four times as much milk today than in 1942; and that Tibetan yaks serve as snow plows as much as milk producers.

The stories are often interesting, but they seem to be stitched together one after the other, logically perhaps, but in the dry style of a thousand index cards filled in by research assistants. Do research assistants still use index cards? Probably not, but that’s what the book feels like, and the recipes that are interleaved with the text do not dismiss that impression.

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** Butter by Elaine Khosrova

Butter: A Rich History is really a cookbook with a history prologue, but is delightful even if, like me, you pretty much skip the cookbook. The author takes us from the Asian steppes to Ireland, along the way covering the technology of butter, butter art (Tibetan sacred art, not the amateurish decorations of Midwestern country fairs), butter as medicine, and the complicated science behind the health benefits of eating butter versus margarine. It’s all very delicious and I suppose reading and making the recipes would only enhance the pleasure.

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*** Hippie Food by Jonathan Kauffman

If you find it completely normal to eat tofu, yogurt, brown rice, whole-grain bread, or kale, it may be surprising to realize that 40 years ago it would have been extremely challenging to find them in a grocery store or restaurant, in the US that is.  Hippie Food: How Back-to-the-Landers, Longhairs, and Revolutionaries Changed the Way We Eat details how it all started (in California, of course!) with a surprising mix of influences, from “right-eating” maniacs who killed their devotees by forgetting that scurvy happens,  to travelers who wanted to replicate delicious meals they enjoyed during overseas travel made possible by cheaper airfare, to environmentalists who decried the hidden costs of eating meats, to idealists who created co-op stores. I was struck by how many of the pioneers had very little background in nutrition, agriculture, or the food industry, and yet they pushed forth a revolution. It’s an interesting look at changes that came slowly but transformed what we eat and how we eat.

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** The Taste of Empire by Lizzie Collingham

The subtitle of The Taste of Empire: How Britain’s Quest for Food Shaped the Modern World is probably backwards, in the sense that the author mostly shows that the quest for economic domination shaped the food of Britain rather than the other way round. She builds each chapter of the book around a specific meal eaten in a particular place and time that defines some kind of new historical development, some well-known but others not so much, such as the mass importation of British indentured servants alongside African slaves into in the West Indies. And she does not ignore liquid nourishment, from rum distilleries in Massachusetts to pale ale beer in India. It’s a lot of information, spanning 400 years — and with sometimes surprising rationalizations of the greatness of the empire…

Overall, the good news is: as a group, we are eating much better than we used to!

 

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