Tag Archives: psychology

*** Maybe You Should Talk To Someone by Lori Gottlieb

Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, HER Therapist, and Our Lives Revealed is a delightful mix of what it’s like to be a therapist, how therapists behave when they go see a therapist for their own struggles (and not just to get a second opinion on a client), and the author’s personal, twisted journey into becoming a therapist (it’s LA, so show business in involved, but also med school!)

The three strands come together perfectly and you will close the book wanting more.

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Filed under True story

** Help Me by Marianne Power

There are other books of the genre of Help Me! that show real-life attempts of following self-help books, but none as honest and funny as this one, in which the author undertakes to sort out her drinking, crushing debt, and so far unsuccessful search for a boyfriend by relying on self-help books. (She is a reasonably successful journalist, although impeded by too many hangovers and general disorganization.)

In a Bridget Jones sort of way, she takes us along as she struggles to organize her finances and conquer her fears of just about everything. The best chapter may well be when she decides to seek rejection by making outrageous requests, proving to herself that she can survive all kinds of humiliation (and sometimes get what she can only dream of!) The other hilarious part of the book are the contributions of her mother and friends to her efforts–and they are not all cheering. Perhaps the best part of the book is the fact that she is not the perfect success she was aiming for at the end.

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Filed under Non fiction

*** The Misinformation Age by Cailin O’Connor and James Owen Weatherall

Using simple models for how we can influence others in our network, The Misinformation Age: How False Beliefs Spread shows how ideas can spread, including misinformed ones. The authors are professors of philosophy of science so there are many scientific examples, but not just that. And unlike Connected, this book’s diagram are pleasantly laid out and therefore much more understandable. The demonstration of how propagandists can spread fake news is particularly chilling.

The weakest portion of the book is the (very short) one with solutions to the problem. The first encourages scientists to create joint studies, which is a lovely idea, but pretty unrealistic considering the pressure to publish, I think, and the others are no more likely to happen.

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Filed under Non fiction

* Connected by Nicholas Christakis and James Fowler

Connected: The Surprising Power of Our Social Networks and How They Shape Our Lives  explores how our ability to form tight networks makes us susceptible to mass hysteria, contagious suicides, or losing weight together. It also shows how understanding networks can help fight STDs or smoking.  Too bad the illustrations of said networks are poor ! Also, with a 2009 copyright the influence of online networks is presented as a new thing, worthy of consideration. Indeed.

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Filed under New fiction, Non fiction

** Asking for a Friend by Jessica Weisberg

Asking for a Friend: Three Centuries of Advice on Life, Love, Money, and Other Burning Questions from a Nation Obsessed gives us three centuries of advice-writing, presenting both well-known advice givers (Benjamin Franklin, Dear Abby, Dr Spock, or Ms. Manners) and lesser-known figures, whom I thought were all the more interesting that they have not yet been chronicled to death. The book is both a series of portraits, interesting on their own, and excerpts of the ever-evolving principles of the advice given, sometimes within the span of the advice-givers themselves.

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Filed under Non fiction

** Rule Makers, Rule Breakers by Michele Gelfand

It’s awfully difficult to break the world into two parts, and while the author of Rule Makers, Rule Breakers: How Tight and Loose Cultures Wire Our World would very much like us to believe that there are two types of culture in the world, tight and loose, she has to resort to unhealthy contortions (and a few willful oversights) to keep the belief alive.

Not to say that some of her observations are not intriguing. How could it be that 12% of Americans (in a “loose” culture) write with their left hand, while only 3% of Turks do? And we can certainly see how scarcity, disease, and (lack of) diversity would push cultures to be tighter. But there are so many exceptions, which the author waves away (or ignores entirely). It’s annoying. Also annoying is the relentless analysis of recent political changes using the tight/loose distinction exclusively.

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Filed under Non fiction

*** The Art of Gathering by Priya Parker

The Art of Gathering: How We Meet and Why It Matters is in many ways a business book, but the author makes it clear, including in the examples she uses, that her ideas and recommendations apply just as well to family and friends gatherings as to business meetings. It may be a bit jarring to think of defining a purpose for a family gathering — but there is one, always, unwritten and undiscussed, so why not make it more explicit, and perhaps different from the last time we gathered? Why not set the stage with the invitation? Why not worry about how guests will be welcomed, and not just what we will feed them? We may not put on the World Economic Forum, but our next dinner party could be transformed.

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Filed under Non fiction