Tag Archives: neuroscience

* The Master and His Emissary by Iain McGilchrist

I strongly suspect that most of the 159 Amazon reviewers of The Master and His Emissary: The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World did not actually read the entire book. Not because it’s long, at 600 pages, but because the writing is often impenetrable. Here’s a sample: “There are several ways in which the Reformation anticipated the hermetic self-reflexivity of post-modernism, perfectly expressed in the infinite regress of self-referral within some of the visual images which Koerner examines [..]”.

This is from the second part of the book, in which the author boldly (foolishly?) understates to explain all of humankind (Western) history through the thesis of the collaborating brain hemispheres. The first part is much more accessible and convincing, as the author wades through published research to illustrates how the right hemisphere, the big-picture hemisphere, collaborates with the left hemisphere, the detail-oriented hemisphere. lf you pick up the book, you may want to stop after part 1.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Non fiction

*** Why We Sleep by Matthew Walker

Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams, despite its title, is not a self-help book, but a serious book written by a scientist who has spent his life studying sleep — and is firmly convinced, as I am, that good things come to people who sleep long and well.

The author provides many examples of  studies that show that poor sleep wrecks memories, destroys healthy eating, makes us susceptible to diseases, and overall turns us into blubbering idiots (and blubbering idiots that do not know they are blubbering idiots, to boot!) Interestingly, the exact mechanisms of sleep are not well understood, even though the consequences are.

So, good night! (Sadly, there are no magic tricks to it, just the old boring techniques of sleeping at regular hours, long enough, avoiding caffeine, etc.)

Leave a comment

Filed under Non fiction

** Into the Gray Zone by Adrian Owen

The author of Into the Gray Zone: A Neuroscientist Explores the Border Between Life and Death tells medical stories of how his team found that some people in vegetative state actually had some brain function, and some subsequently regained some consciousness. The science if fascinating, if a work in progress. The concern, if course, is that although some patients, can indeed “wake up”, it’s completely unclear whether they will regain full consciousness or continue to exist in an in-between state. It seems, for now, that the few complete successes recalled in the book are more flukes than models.

Leave a comment

Filed under Non fiction

** The Man Who Was Not There by Anil Ananthaswamy

The Man Who Was Not There: Investigations Into The Strange New Science Of The Self is an enjoyable whirlwind through neuroscience, looking at strange syndromes and disorders through many portraits of unfortunate patients who are not quite sure who they are. It’s a little depressing to see how little we know about what causes all of these woes…

Leave a comment

Filed under Non fiction

*** The Man Without a Shadow by Joyce Carol Oates

The Man Without a Shadow is an amnesiac, abundantly studied by the heroine, a neuroscientist whose professional fame comes from her exceptional subject. Many professional boundaries are crossed, and in any case the line between studying and exploiting is very porous.

I thought that the author captured in fine and interesting details the travails of the dedicated female scientist in a hostile time and place. The vagaries of memory are also explored in compelling and disturbing ways. The story moves slowly and the end is disappointing, but it lingers in the reader’s brain.

Leave a comment

Filed under New fiction

** The Ghost in My Brain by Clark Elliott


The author of The Ghost in My Brain: How a Concussion Stole My Life and How the New Science of Brain Plasticity Helped Me Get it Back is a university professor who, during a car accident, suffered a disabling concussion the effects of which lasted for years before he found relief in a special neuro-training program. The book follows the familiar arc of recovery memoirs: despair, then redemption. Of course the specific treatment he found is presented as miraculous when it may only work for some, so the later part of the book can rankle. However, the description of his struggles and how concussions are an invisible injury that debilitate the sufferer and startle family and friends is written very openly and movingly.

Leave a comment

Filed under True story

** Making Space by Jennifer Groh


Making Space: How the Brain Knows Where Things Are is a book about serious science, so as early as page 17 it discusses how opsin helps us detect light — and I will admit that I don’t care to know in that much detail, nor do I think that the densely written page 17 can successfully explain to a novice what a protein is, what active sites on a protein are, and exactly what opsin does. That being said, if you can either muster the patience and courage to dive into the details, or if you have the fortitude to skip over them, you will find plenty of interesting experiments that show how we use our hearing, eyes, and touch to figure out where we are in space and where everything else is.

Leave a comment

Filed under Non fiction