Tag Archives: poverty

* The Reproach of Hunger by David Rieff


Do you hate Bill Gates? Then you will love The Reproach of Hunger: Food, Justice, and Money in the Twenty-First Century, which often reads like a 300-page diatribe against him personally and his charitable foundation.

Why the author would choose this form of expression is unclear. Basically he hates everything about food programs. He hates the fact that the percentage of very poor people in the world has fallen (because the absolute number has increased — which is sad, but does not negate progress, right?) He hates that many people involved in antipoverty programs (including his nemesis, Bill Gates) are optimistic that the situation will continue improve. He thinks that we should all stop all optimism, right away. He knows, just knows that harvests will fail and we will all starve and he and Malthus predicted it: there are just too many humans on too small a planet. He hates that philanthropists choose to fund school before everyone knows that we should, instead, feed babies and toddlers (he has a point but perhaps it’s better to fund schools than say, wars). He can’t even start to consider the benefits of GMO crops because women in sub-Saharan Africa are still having too many babies (Should we pause all efforts while they decide that 2.2 is a good number? That would be insane.) He also deplores that the same antipoverty mavens noted above (and in particular the very bad Bill Gates, did I mention he hates him?) are able to applaud when countries headed by dictators make some progress fighting poverty.

It’s very tiring to read a book filled with such hate of everything. Too bad, since there are many valid points in the book, in particular the problem of doing good only when good can be publicly recognized and admired.

 

 

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Filed under Non fiction

*** Kid Moses by Mark Thornton


In an even tone, Kid Moses tells the story of Moses, a young child who lives in Tanzania, orphaned and homeless. He gets beaten up, gets a job, spends some time in a cushy orphanage, escapes with his best friend, and generally makes his own way through life.

It’s sad. And we know, hope, pray, that he will make it. Quite a feat of writing from a child’s point of view.

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** Stories from the Shadows by James O’Connell


Stories From the Shadows: Reflections of a Street Doctor is a collection of stories written about a Boston physician who works with homeless patients. Many stories just tell a particular person’s story, although others tackle more general themes about homelessness, poverty, and mental disease.

The stories are compelling, and the author is, without a doubt, a great physician, very much attuned to his patients and their needs. I would have liked more of a focus on solutions, at least partial solutions since it’s clear that the problem is immense, for how cities can tackle the problem of homelessness with both humanity and financial restraint. The stories make it pretty clear that right now, we are both spending a lot of money and doing a terrible job (most of the time). Not a good combo.

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* Hand to Mouth by Linda Tirado


It’s too bad that Hand to Mouth: Living in Bootstrap America is written in such an aggressive tone, which is a real turnoff for readers, because its contents are edifying and well worth reflecting about.

The author talks about her life as a poor working (married!) mother in the US, working multiple jobs and still never managing to maintain a stable housing situation or even hang on to a working car. When pundits intone that poor people just need to behave better, it would be useful for them to think about the raw deal that workers at the bottom of the heap get: low pay, sure, but also irregular hours, with immediate loss of jobs if they cannot accommodate last-minute scheduling changes. And it is hard to get one of those minimum-wage jobs, as employers routinely run credit checks, even for run-of-the-mill jobs, which are often unflattering for poor applicants.

I recommend this book for its content, as well as the spirited voice of the woman who writes it, but the grating and accusatory tone, not to mention the salty language, makes it challenging to read.

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*** Quesadillas by Juan Pablo Villalobos


Quesadillas is the funny, alternatively absurd and harsh story of a poor Mexican family with seven children and too little food (and only one type of food: quesadillas!). The narrator, the second son called Orestes, Oreo for short, lives under the dictatorship of his father, struggles to get enough food, has awkward encounters with the son of their rich neighbors, becomes the helper of a cow inseminator, and eventually leaves to search for his missing younger brothers, Castor and Pollux (but of course: the names are chosen by their teacher-father) who may have been abducted by aliens. Here is a fantastic voice piercing through the (wonderful) translation. Highly recommended despite the lack of a proper ending.

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** Without a Net by Michelle Kennedy


Without a Net: Middle Class and Homeless (with Kids) in America tells the author’s brief but very painful summer of homelessness, with three children, one still in diapers, in a small New England town. She works, hard, as a waitress but doesn’t seem to be able to accumulate enough for a deposit on a rental, so she knits together a life of sleeping in her car, getting her sympathetic coworkers to check on the kids in the evenings, and carefully considered purchases of groceries and showers.

It’s remarkable that her efforts to get public assistance promptly fail with not much effort from the social workers to provide real help. (And after all, her main requirement is that down payment, not a lifetime of handouts.) But the best part of the story are the kids’ stories — showing once again that children can be surprisingly resilient, at least for a summer, and at least with one fiercely loving, if occasionally misguided, parent.

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* The American Way of Poverty by Sasha Abramsky


It would be interesting for a book that describes poverty in America to give some statistics about the poor: how old they are, what education they have, whether they were born in poverty, how people born in poverty may have climbed out of it. We don’t get many statistics in  The American Way of Poverty: How the Other Half Still Lives, mostly personal stories, affecting, but that leave the reader straining for a higher-level understanding of the problem.

And it would be interesting for a book that prescribes remedies to the problem of poverty to give comprehensive recommendations that consider multiple aspects of the issue and rely on quantitative evaluations of past efforts. Not so much here. For instance, the author dismisses any improvements to K-12 education out of hand, stating that children who are hungry or homeless cannot possibly benefit from improvements in schools. That may be, but are all poor children literally homeless? And would not a strong school system allow at least some to progress to non-poor lives? And how can the author, at the same time, vaunt the benefit of a $5,000 award given to each child at birth to cover university tuition?  Surely a sensible homeless parent would take that money and make a deposit on a place to live? I certainly would. It seems that the author’s main solution to poverty is to tax more and give more money to the poor. It would certainly alleviate immediate problems, but that’s not exactly a recipe for changing the system that creates entrenched inequality for future generations, is it?

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